Google docs get fancy with visuals

“Google rolled out enhancements to parts of its Google Docs suite this morning that allow users to make use of third-party “gadgets.” The gadgets, which can be written by anyone with the help of a Google API, make use of data stored in Google Spreadsheets and display it in a variety of different ways (however the developer wants, really). But the gadgets aren’t just limited to making your spreadsheets prettier—they can be embedded onto a personalized iGoogle page, or published anywhere that lets you use HTML and iframes.” (via Ars Technica)

PS. This has great potential. Effectively, it could act as hosted scalable database (resting on google servers) to be used as a backend for strong data-driven apps/websites.

arrow_blue_small Hands-on: Google Docs get gadgets

Google supports Non-Profits in more ways

Google for Non-Profits offers “a one-stop shop for tools to help advance your organization’s mission in a smart, cost-efficient way.” This site includes ideas and tutorials on ways Google tools can be used to promote non-profits, raise money and operate more efficiently.

Features include standard Google services such as Gmail (including hosted email), YouTube, Blogger, Gadgets, Earth, Calender and Analytics. The two interesting services are the provision of Google Checkout for free to non-profits who want to take donations on their site, and Google Grants, free advertising for non-profits via Google’s Adwords network. (via TechCrunch)

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Google Apps for your domain – personal experience

Google Apps for your domain is great for small businesses and organisations that would like myName@myDomain.com functionality, with free backing Gmail accounts – with excellent spam filtering and generous Inbox sizes. However, it is quite disappointing to create domain pages for myDomain.com and feels very 1990s.

arrow_blue_small What Does Google Apps for Your Domain Actually Do?

arrow_blue_small Google Apps for your domain

Google Sky

Google unveiled a browser version of its Google Sky application on Thursday for people who don’t want to download the Google Earth software. The browser version allows you to zoom in and out and pan around the celestial bodies, search for planets and galaxies and view the sky through infrared, x-ray, ultraviolet, and microwave views. There are also galleries of some of the best shots from the Hubble telescope and others. You can also listen to podcasts and look at historical maps of the sky.

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Recession has come to US, says WSJ survey

“The U.S. has finally slid into recession, according to the majority of economists in the latest Wall Street Journal economic-forecasting survey, a view that was reinforced by new data showing a sharp drop in retail sales last month.”

arrow_blue_small Most economists say recession has arrived as outlook darkens
arrow_blue_small The complete WSJ economists survey